Montgomery County Taxpayers League

The Voice of Taxpayers of Montgomery County, Maryland
Montgomery County Taxpayers League

The Voice of Taxpayers of Montgomery County, Maryland

Latest Posts

“How to End the Monopoly and Recover the Money”

From Seventh State an article by Adam Pagnucco.about ending Montgomery County’s monopoly on liquor:

The County’s Department of Liquor Control “monopoly earns money for the county and the [County] Executive does not want to lose it…Through a combination of a few more stores, incremental revenue sharing with the state and restructuring of the liquor bonds, the county could free itself from its liquor monopoly with no significant financial consequences.  No new taxes or fees are necessary.  And the county would see the creation of new jobs, more income, more economic activity and greater competitiveness with its neighbors as a result.”

As always we invite your comments.

 

 

“A County’s Self-Inflicted Compensation Crisis”

From Governing.com:

“One reason why even a large tax increase can’t cover the county’s expenses is that over the last six years deals negotiated by County Executive Isiah Leggett raised the wages of police, firefighters and other county employees by between 25.4 and 31.5 percent. Leggett says one reason for the hefty raises was his desire to avoid arbitration; the county has lost 16 of 20 arbitration decisions since 1988.”

Your comments are welcomed.

Maryland Homeowners Property Tax Credit Calculator

From the Montgomery County Civic Federation:

The State of Maryland and Montgomery County offer credits against a homeowner’s property tax bill if the property taxes exceed a percentage of homeowners gross income.  If your income was $60,000 or less in 2015, there is a good chance that you can cut your property tax bill by hundreds or thousands of dollars by applying for the Homeowners Property Tax Credit.

Every year, many homeowners who are eligible for the credit fail to apply because they either don’t know about the credit or don’t realize that the small amount of paperwork required to apply can save them hundreds or thousands of dollars.  This calculator is intended to spur homeowners to apply for the credit.  The deadline to apply is September 1, 2016.

“Unions kill a smart arbitration proposal in Montgomery County”

From the Washington Post of July 29, 2016:

“OVER THE past six years, wages for Montgomery County’s about 9,000 public employees — police, firefighters, budget analysts, clerks, librarians, bus drivers, jail guards and others — have grown between 25 and 31 percent. That increase, nearly three times the inflation rate over the same period, is much greater than that enjoyed by most public- and private-sector workers, including federal workers. Montgomery taxpayers are on the hook for those raises, mainly through their property taxes, which will spike 9 percent this year.”

The proposal had its genesis in the Organizational Reform Commission report submitted to the County Council in 2011.  MCTL President Fidler was a member of the Commission.

As always we invite your comments.

 

 

 

 

Testimony by Pres. Fidler on Transparency in Labor Negotiations

Testimony Before the County Council on Expedited Bill 24-16, Collective Bargaining – Impasse Procedures – Amendments

by  Joan Fidler, President of the Montgomery County Taxpayers League, July 12, 2016:

President Floreen and members of the Council, I am Joan Fidler, president of the Montgomery County Taxpayers League and I am here to testify in support of Expedited Bill 24-16 on Collective Bargaining – Impasse Procedures.

First, we would like to thank President Floreen for proposing the bill as it reflects a degree of courage that we admire. It begins to restore the balance for the taxpayers of the county.

Bill 24-15 is a new beginning. Let us count the ways:

The bill provides transparency – it requires public disclosure at the outset of bargaining and at evidentiary hearings.

The bill introduces objectivity – it separates the roles of mediator and arbitrator

The bill recognizes the need for a level playing field – it replaces the single arbitrator with a 3-member panel.

There will be opposition to this bill from the labor unions. We believe that labor unions are important and so are employee rights. But taxpayers are important too and they too have rights.

So to the argument that requiring public disclosure would impede efficiency and effectiveness, we would respond that opening proposals are not exactly state secrets to be hidden from the taxpaying public and that evidentiary hearings in all trials are open to the public. Why not here?

To the argument that the transparency provisions of this bill are harmful, we would argue that the only two transparency provisions in this bill are opening positions and evidentiary hearings. Should the taxpayer be barred from those? The bill does not require any open bargaining sessions.

To the argument that using the same individual as mediator and arbitrator streamlines the process, we would argue that separating the two roles is a standard method of mediation used in our court system and in other local collective bargaining laws. Why not here?

To the argument that labor relations professionals will be replaced by retired judges, we would argue that retired judges have vast experience in assessing facts fairly. Why would we reject an experienced judge?

Most important, the current system of interest arbitration has a direct and tremendous impact on the cost of County wages and benefits. In the last 3 years most county employees have had pay raises of 21% with another 4.5% this year. The bulk of property tax increases fund the salaries and benefits of our county employees. It is said that he who pays the piper calls the tune. Could taxpayers see the arbitration sheet music before the score is settled?

We invite you to post your comments.

 

Booing and heckling against transparency in collective bargaining

President Joan Fidler of the Taxpayers League testified on July 12, 2016, before the County Council in support of Bill 24-16, Collective Bargaining – Impasse Procedures – Amendments.  She was booed and heckled by union workers during her statement in the last paragraph of her testimony where she stated “In the last three years most county employees have had pay raises of 21% with another 4.5% this year”.

For those who do not follow the minutiae of pay raise percentages, here is the source on Page 9.

http://montgomerycountymd.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=6&clip_id=10488&meta_id=92904

Specifically “…..For merit system County Government employees not at their maximum salary (nearly three-fourths of the total), the compound pay increases negotiated by the Executive and approved by the Council for these three years” (FY 2014 – 2016) “total 20.6 percent for general government employees and still more for public safety employees eligible for make-up service increments.”

In the video of the hearing, President Fidler’s testimony begins at minute 16 and lasts for 4 minutes.

“Is Maryland building ‘Cadillacs or Buicks’ for its new public schools?”

From the Maryland Reporter website of July 7, 2016:

“In a heated discussion with the head of the [state] school construction program, Gov. Larry Hogan and Comptroller Peter Franchot aired serious concerns about the state’s spending on public school projects at Wednesday’s Board of Public Works meeting.  “We can’t just keep shoveling more and more money without accountability,” Hogan said.  “The taxpayers are getting pretty frustrated with the results.”